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HELP needed with super heavy IGES file from laserscanner

Geronimo

New member
I am not a pro in rhino and I have to model a fence form scanned objects.

The objects are scanned by a laser, finetuned through geomagic and then exported to IGES. I have to rotate and move them in the right order to design a fence, but they are way too heavy to do anything with them.

The objects are single bamboo brenches and each brench is about 150 MB IGES file!!!

Does anybody know what the best way is to get the files handable without losing any quality??

THNX if you have any suggestions!!!

gr.

Geronimo
 

fergusda

New member
Reduce polymesh density

1: Download MeshLab (free)

2: Use the 'Quadratic Edge Collapse Decimation' filter to reduce the point count down (I generally reduce to 20% or 0.2 of original). This will reduce the scan density where it isn't needed, and keep the detail around areas of high curvature.

3: Save the file as a *.PLY, which is slightly smaller that .STL or .OBJ.

4: Open in Rhino.


-You can reduce the density more depending on your needs. 150mb is pretty painful in Rhino; 15mb is generally more manageable.

-Dan
Bluegalaxy Design
Bluegalaxy Design
 

fergusda

New member
Reduce polymesh density

This is one possible trick so you can OPEN the files in Rhino, but they won't be NURBS surfaces anymore.

1: Export the file as an .STL from a 3D cad program (You can download 3D Object Converter)

2: Download MeshLab (free)

3: Use the 'Quadratic Edge Collapse Decimation' filter to reduce the point count down (I generally reduce to 20% or 0.2 of original). This will reduce the scan density where it isn't needed, and keep the detail around areas of high curvature.

4: Save the file as a *.PLY, which is slightly smaller that .STL or .OBJ.

5: Open in Rhino as a Mesh.

6: You can recreate new NURBS surfaces from the mesh data, but it'l take some time.


-You can reduce the density more depending on your needs. 150mb is pretty painful in Rhino; 15mb is generally more manageable.

-Dan
Bluegalaxy Design
www.bluegalaxydesign.com
 

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