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Need flat sheet bent into Cylindrical profile

CADSilver

New member
Hi,
I want to bend a sheet into 300 dia & 360 Long cylindrical drum and want to drill some holes on its surface. I made as cylindrical sheet metal itself and drilled holes on it. And I used 'Unfold' feature to flaten it. If we supress 'Unfold' feature, we would get our basic cylindrical drum. But I as you know, that is not exact fabrication procedure to be followed generally. So first I want to take a flat sheet(PI * 300 dia(length) X 360 (wide)) and drill some holes on it and then want to bend it as cylinder of 600 dia. Any suggestions.
 

SolidMartin

New member
Hi,
Add the holes when it is unfolded. Then Insert/Sheet Metal/Fold. Check collect all bends. And then ok. The holes will not be round in the finished part this way, If you like to have round holes in the final part, you have to add the holes when it is bent.
Cheers!
 

Ody_Mech_Engr

New member
Bend cylindrical part

Actually, the distortion of the hole can accurately reflect what occurs in the actual part if you use the right parameters. If the sheet metal is blanked and pierced flat, then rolled, even the actual part will have this distortion.

However, to the best of my knowledge, Solidworks requires a flat surface on every sheet metal part. This surface can be VERY small, but it has to exist. As such you cannot have a perfect cylinder with no flats. I've modeled such parts and carefully selected parameters to level the smallest sliver of flat. The interesting thing is that this again is relatively true to the real world. As you roll a cylindrical sheet, there will be a small area on the roll near the edges of the part that does not fully form as it slips through the rollers. Purists may not like it, but I feel it shows that Solidworks can be a great tool to reflect real-world considerations.
 

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