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Projecting sketches questions

rbarata

New member
I have a doubt about projections: when I make a sketch projection, if I'm thinking correctly, the projected sketch is constraint because it is associated with the original sketch.
And what about if I isolated it? Looking at the exercises I've been doing, although the projected sketch keeps the same positions and dimensions of the original, it is not really constrainted because I can move it with the cursor.
So, my questions are: am I thinking correctly? How can I "fix" the original constraints in the projected sketch after I isolate it?

Thank you
 

MrCATIA

Super Moderator
I have a doubt about projections: when I make a sketch projection, if I'm thinking correctly, the projected sketch is constraint because it is associated with the original sketch.
You are correct. Any projected geometry is linked back to it's parent. Yellow sketch geometry indicates this.

And what about if I isolated it?
Why are you isolating projected geometry?

If you isolate, you are losing the link to the parent geometry. In most cases, isolate is not a good thing to do.

How can I "fix" the original constraints in the projected sketch after I isolate it?
1. Don't isolate

2. If you isolate sketch geometry, you have to re-constrain the geometry.
 
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rbarata

New member
Why are you isolating projected geometry?

If you isolate, you are losing the link to the parent geometry. In most cases, isolate is not a good thing to do.
A small experiment showed me that I was not seeing the whole picture... , since the projected sketch is constrainted by the original, I was thinking that I was not able to change it. Now I see that I was wrong. So, no need to isolate.

I was doing it because I am working with 3 different sketches, each one of them has some features in common with the others.

Thank you
 

MrCATIA

Super Moderator
.... I am working with 3 different sketches, each one of them has some features in common with the others.
This is an ideal situation to use linked geometry, such as projections! Instead of having to draw and maintain all three sketches, just define and edit the geometry in one sketch, and project (link) into the other sketches. When you have to revise the design, just change the one sketch and the other sketches will change when updated.

Tip: Let one sketch be the parent (master), and always project from that sketch into the others. (Links should always be uni-directional [from the parent, to the child]; never bi-directional.)
 
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